© S M Jones Content is free for most uses - see legal stuff. Last update 23 May 2020
The descendants of John Parris and Jane Neville of Wrotham, Kent, are documented in the following pages. The family had links with the neighbouring villages, in particular Halling, Snodland, Ridley and Stansted. Some emigrated to the United States to establish the family in Illinois, Nebraska and California. We think (but have no evidence yet to prove) that a Parris family from the Offham area in Kent may be linked to John and Jane. This branch is covered as well. The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names provides two origins: a locative name from Paris, the place name taken from the Celtic people the Parisii who settled on the banks of the River Seine; and a relationship name from the Old French personal name Patrice, Patris and the Latin Patricius (from “patrician” (nobleman) that became associated with the Trojan hero Paris of Homer’s Iliad). If you have a connection to any individual or family featured here, or if you want to leave us your feedback, tap or click the icon to contact us .
Steve and Pauline Jones’ Family History
We are not makers of history. We are made by history.Martin Luther King Jr.

The Parris Family of Wrotham, Kent

 Wrotham stands on the Pilgrims' Way in Kent, at the foot of the North Downs. It was described in the early 1870s as a “small town, a parish, a sub-district, and a hundred … at the foot of chalk hills, 6 miles east of Sevenoaks”. The name first occurs as Uurotaham in 788 which means 'homestead of a man called Wrōta”. It was known in the Domesday Book (1086) as Broteham.  The village of Halling, consisting of Lower Halling, Upper Halling and North Halling, is scattered over some 5 km along the River Medway parallel to the Pilgrims' Way. Chalk and lime quarrying in Halling supported the cement industry, provided many families with work and helped to improve the area’s transport infrastructure. Edward William Parris 1900-1983 George John Parris 1896-1986 Gordon Neville Parris 1939-1980 John Parris 1869-1953 & grandson Albert Norman Parris 1931-2008 Melvin Parris 1866-1927 & son Kenneth Burlton Parris 1911-2005 Amos Theodore Parris 1860-1946
The site uses the following icons to link to further information.  Census transcription		War Graves citation		General notes		Contact us    Where you see an icon, click or tap to view the information or to get in touch. The date format dd/mm/yyyy is used throughout.
Steve & Pauline Jones’ Family History
We are not makers of history. We are made by history.Martin Luther King Jr.
© S M Jones Content is free for most uses - see legal stuff. Last update 23 May 2020

The Parris Family of Wrotham, Kent

The descendants of John Parris and Jane Neville of Wrotham, Kent, are documented in the following pages. The family had links with the neighbouring villages, in particular Halling, Snodland, Ridley and Stansted. Some emigrated to the United States to establish the family in Illinois, Nebraska and California. We think (but have no evidence yet to prove) that a Parris family from the Offham area in Kent may be linked to John and Jane. This branch is covered as well. The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names provides two origins: a locative name from Paris, the place name taken from the Celtic people the Parisii who settled on the banks of the River Seine; and a relationship name from the Old French personal name Patrice, Patris and the Latin Patricius (from “patrician” (nobleman) that became associated with the Trojan hero Paris of Homer’s Iliad). If you have a connection to any individual or family featured here, or if you want to leave us your feedback, tap or click the icon to contact us .
Wrotham stands on the Pilgrims' Way in Kent, at the foot of the North Downs. It was described in the early 1870s as a “small town, a parish, a sub-district, and a hundred … at the foot of chalk hills, 6 miles east of Sevenoaks”. The name first occurs as Uurotaham in 788 which means 'homestead of a man called Wrōta”. It was known in the Domesday Book (1086) as Broteham.  The village of Halling, consisting of Lower Halling, Upper Halling and North Halling, is scattered over some 5 km along the River Medway parallel to the Pilgrims' Way. Chalk and lime quarrying in Halling supported the cement industry, provided many families with work and helped to improve the area’s transport infrastructure. The site uses the following icons to link to further information.  Census transcription  War Graves citation  Notes e.g. military, criminal, wills.  Contact us  Where you see an icon, click or tap to view the information or to get in touch.  The date format dd/mm/yyyy is used throughout.