© S M Jones Content is free for most uses - see legal stuff. Last update 23 May 2020
Our starting point is the family of William and Ann Jones of Much Wenlock, Shropshire. We know little about them and suspect, given the surname and proximity to the border, that their origins were in Wales. Their descendants moved around the country from Shropshire to Staffordshire and into Leicestershire, Essex, the South London area, Berkshire, Warwickshire and Hertfordshire. We’ve also traced family members in Canada. The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names describe it as a variant of the Middle English name Jon(e) with a post medieval addition of -s. It began to be adopted as a non-hereditary surname in parts of Wales from the 16th century onwards, but did not become a widespread hereditary surname until the 18th and 19th centuries. If you have a connection to any individual or family featured here, or if you want to leave us your feedback, tap or click the icon to contact us .
Steve and Pauline Jones’ Family History
If you don’t know where you came from, you won’t know where you are going. You have to study your history. Gil Scott-Heron

The Jones Family of Much Wenlock, Shropshire

 Much Wenlock was described in 1868 as “a parish, market town, municipal and parliamentary borough, locally in the franchise of Wenlock Borough, county Salop, 12 miles S.E. of Shrewsbury, and 5 from Ironbridge. It has a station on the Severn Valley branch of the Great Western railway”. The town grew around a monastery founded around 680 by Merewalh, a son of King Penda of Mercia. It flourished until around 874 when a Danish Viking attack occurred. In the 11th century another religious house was built on the same site by Leofric and in the 12th century this was replaced by a Cluniac priory, the ruins of which can still be seen. The town also played a part in the birth of the modern Olympic Games. Much Wenlock is the birthplace of Dr William Penny Brookes, the inspiration for the modern Olympic Movement. Betty Doris Jones 1922-2003 Fanny Elizabeth Jones 1888-1971 Herbert Henry Jones 1895-1942 Ralph Jnes 1936-2009
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The site uses the following icons to link to further information.  Census transcription		War Graves citation		General notes		Contact us    Where you see an icon, click or tap to view the information or to get in touch. The date format dd/mm/yyyy is used throughout.
Steve & Pauline Jones’ Family History
If you don’t know where you came from,you won’t know where you are going.You have to study your history. Gil Scott-Heron
© S M Jones Content is free for most uses - see legal stuff. Last update 23 May 2020

The Jones Family of Much Wenlock, Shropshire

Our starting point is the family of William and Ann Jones of Much Wenlock, Shropshire. We know little about them and suspect, given the surname and proximity to the border, that their origins were in Wales. Their descendants moved around the country from Shropshire to Staffordshire and into Leicestershire, Essex, the South London area, Berkshire, Warwickshire and Hertfordshire. We’ve also traced family members in Canada. The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names describe it as a variant of the Middle English name Jon(e) with a post medieval addition of -s. It began to be adopted as a non-hereditary surname in parts of Wales from the 16th century onwards, but did not become a widespread hereditary surname until the 18th and 19th centuries. If you have a connection to any individual or family featured here, or if you want to leave us your feedback, tap or click the icon to contact us .
Much Wenlock was described in 1868 as “a parish, market town, municipal and parliamentary borough, locally in the franchise of Wenlock Borough, county Salop, 12 miles S.E. of Shrewsbury, and 5 from Ironbridge. It has a station on the Severn Valley branch of the Great Western railway”. The town grew around a monastery founded around 680 by Merewalh, a son of King Penda of Mercia. It flourished until around 874 when a Danish Viking attack occurred. In the 11th century another religious house was built on the same site by Leofric and in the 12th century this was replaced by a Cluniac priory, the ruins of which can still be seen. The town also played a part in the birth of the modern Olympic Games. Much Wenlock is the birthplace of Dr William Penny Brookes, the inspiration for the modern Olympic Movement.
The site uses the following icons to link to further information.  Census transcription  War Graves citation  Notes e.g. military, criminal, wills.  Contact us  Where you see an icon, click or tap to view the information or to get in touch.  The date format dd/mm/yyyy is used throughout.